Archive:

Posts for tag: pediatric dentistry

By Pediatric Dentistry of Kendall
October 14, 2014
Category: Oral Health
ThumbSuckingandyourChildsBite

You've probably heard that thumb sucking can be harmful to your child's mouth, but do you know why?

Keep in mind that thumb sucking is completely normal in children up to a certain age. In fact, 95% of babies suck their thumb! This is because it provides them with a sense of security and a way to test and learn about their new world. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that parents and caregivers encourage children to cease this habit by age three.

Many children stop sucking thumbs by themselves between the ages of two and four. However, if you are having issues getting your child to stop after this point, you should inform us at your next appointment. Thumb sucking can actually block your child's front teeth from fully erupting and can also push the teeth forward. The number of hours per day and how much pressure your child applies will affect how far out of position the teeth end up. Excessive thumb sucking can also cause your child's jaw to develop incorrectly. This is why it is so important to stop sucking habits before permanent teeth start to erupt.

There are many creative ways that you can help your child cut back and eventually stop sucking his or her thumb. You might try to implement some behavioral management techniques, such as offering rewards after your child goes a length of time without thumb sucking. If your child is old enough to understand consequences, you can simply try explaining what will happen if he or she keeps up with this habit. If you continue to have trouble, speak with us at your next appointment and we can discuss other options, such as a mouth appliance that blocks this habit.

If you would like more information about thumb sucking, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Thumb Sucking Affects the Bite.”

By Pediatric Dentistry of Kendall
August 20, 2014
Category: Oral Health
WhyBabyTeethNeedBabying

Even though they eventually fall out, primary (baby) teeth play several vital roles in your child's development. Among other things, they serve as important guides for the developing permanent teeth that will replace them. If any are lost prematurely, the remaining baby teeth start to shift, migrating forward, decreasing the space necessary for the permanent teeth to erupt into their proper positions. This could result in a need for future orthodontics that may have been unnecessary. So it's important to keep primary teeth healthy and in place until they are ready to come out naturally.

Signs & Symptoms of Teething

Primary (baby) teeth typically begin emerging between six and nine months, though as early as three or as late as 12 months can occur. Usually, but not necessarily, the two lower front teeth appear first. All 20 primary teeth are generally in by the age of three.

Some typical signs of teething include: irritability, gum swelling, gnawing, drooling (due to increased saliva production), chin (facial) rash (due to excessive drooling), disrupted sleeping patterns, ear rubbing, and decreased appetite. Symptoms generally start about four days before a tooth emerges, are most intense during the week when the tooth breaks through the gum, and subside about three days following the event.

You may notice small, bluish, translucent “eruption cysts” on your baby's gum where a tooth is breaking through; sometimes blood mixes with the fluid in a cyst, at which point it's called an eruption hematoma. Both generally disappear on their own when the tooth erupts and pops them.

Suggestions for Soothing

To help keep your teething baby as comfortable as possible, try the following:

  • A chilled rubber teething ring, pacifier, or cold wet washcloth
  • Gentle gum massage using a clean finger
  • Cold foods like popsicles when your child is old enough (just be careful about feeding him or her too much sugar, which can cause decay even in newly emerging/emerged teeth)
  • Over-the-counter pain medication such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen in the appropriate dosage

The onset of teething is the perfect time to begin focusing on your child's pediatric dental care. Even though baby teeth eventually fall out, the quality of their care will have a direct and long-lasting impact on the health of the permanent teeth that follow.

If you would like more information about baby teething, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”